Infinity Scarf

Infinity Scarf

49.95

Price in Canadian Dollars; FREE shipment if you spend $150 or more (US/Canada); low shipment flat rates! Convert Can$ to US$ HERE

This is a true Canadian Knit Kit:

The Infinity Scarf by Canadian designer Sylvia Olsen is a traditional Coast Salish design from Canada’s West Coast Natives. The scarf is double thickness.

We use Briggs & Little Sport, a very durable and affordable Canadian fingering yarn. 100% Wool, this yarn is suitable for knitting sweaters, vests, socks, mittens, gloves, hats Weaving blankets or coating material

yarn pick - see photo below:
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Make your choice of yarn shade combination:

(Please be aware that the colours shown may vary from screen to screen)

included in this kit:

  • printed pattern

  • 5 skeins at 113 g of Briggs & Little Sport from the combination of your choice

  • the the electronic pattern will be emailed to you after purchase

skill level: intermediate

washing instructions: hand wash cold  /  dry flat

finished measurement: Length is 162 cm / 65” with circumference joined beginning to end; width is 20 cm / 8” double thickness  

to make it a complete kit we recommend: for peace of mind go to SUPPLIES and order:

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Coast Salish carrying

One of the secrets behind Coast Salish knitting is the method of carrying the wool on the backside of your work. If you look at Fair Isle or Scandinavian knitting, you will likely see stranded colourwork, which looks exactly as it sounds—there are strands of colour on the back of the fabric. Coast Salish knitters weave the yarn they are carrying into every stitch. This may feel cumbersome at first, but I believe it gives the fabric more elasticity and reduces the risk of something (a ring, for example, or the button on a shirt) getting caught in the strands. It also creates a unique effect: the backside of Coast Salish knitting looks like pebbles rather than lines. And weaving in every stitch allows you to carry the contrast colour over many stitches. As there are many knitting styles, so there are many ways to weave in every stitch.